Five ways to supplement your income

The economic situation in Portugal has been reflective of the rest of the world in recent times. The unemployment rates have been high, making it difficult for expats to find much work – especially without speaking Portuguese.

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With the government cracking down on ‘cash-in-hand’ work, and those living ‘under the radar’, there is an inherent need for expats to do things properly.

We have put together five relatively recession-proof types of work that may help you supplement your income – especially if you live in an area with a significant expat population.

1. Hair and beauty
If you live in an area heavily populated with expats, it’s quite possible to build up a good clientele if you work in this sector. Expats that can't speak Portuguese are often nervous of explaining their requirements in a local salon. As such, British hairdressers and beauticians often do well if they market themselves appropriately.

2. IT / web services
If you work in IT support or web design, you will probably find work in expat communities. However, you should prepare yourself for the fact that people simply won’t be willing to pay UK rates.

3.  Bars and restaurants
If you’re only looking for some extra income over the summer months, you probably will find bar and restaurant work at busy Algarve tourist resorts. However, being cynical (yet realistic), you’re unlikely to find much with good money, a legal contract or any kind of guarantee that you won’t be sent on your way as soon as trade dies down.

4. Property management
In Portugal and Spain, you meet a lot of expats who say they work in “property management”. This often means they spend much of their time cleaning holiday apartments, but if you’re happy to do this, you may find some kind of work, at least over the summer months. Be aware, however, that this is a very competitive sector. After all, there are only so many properties to go around the plethora of companies hoping to make money from this activity.

5. Online work
If you are technically literate and have specific skills such as the ability to write press releases or marketing copy, you will (with some hard work) be able to find well-paid work you can do from home via sites like oDesk or eLance.

Don’t expect to become a well-paid online worker without serious effort. You need to “pay your dues” with low-paid assignments until you build up your online reputation and feedback scores. Once you’ve done this, however, you can realistically begin to build a “work from home” career.

Whichever method you choose for earning that much-needed cash, make sure that when the time comes to transfer money from your UK account to Portugal or back to the UK in order to pay for your various bills and commitments, you employ the services of a currency expert like Smart Currency Exchange. Smart provides exchange rates that are typically up to 4% better than those offered by your bank, and you don’t need us to tell you that this can equate to quite a substantial saving each and every time you make your regular payment. To read more about how they can help you secure rates and guide you through the process, download their free report here.

If you haven't done so already, download your free copy of the Portugal Buying Guide. 


Further reading for Living In Portugal

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Finding work in Portugal

There are a number of ways that UK expats can fund their lifestyle in Portugal.
Read more...

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Social life in Portugal

The best way to get settled in Portugal is to find out as much as you can about your new community.
Read more...

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Heathcare

One of the first things you need to do once you arrive in Portugal is find out where your nearest hospital is.
Read more...

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Education in Portugal

Are you emigrating to Portugal with school-age children?
 

Read more...


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For more information on buying in or making the move overseas, contact the Portugal Buying Guide Resources Team on 0207 898 0549 or email them here.


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Don't forget to download your own copy of the Portugal Buying Guide, your guide to successfully purchase a property in France
Download the Guide


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